The Youngster’s Dilemma

Continuing with my love for family issues, let us look at the thinking that goes behind a person who has just passed out from college and is keen on finding a goal for himself/herself.

Most of my batchmates and friends want to have a luxurious life, the kind of life one would normally dream about or see in TV or movies. And why not, they have the right to decide what they want to become and how they want to lead their lives.

But in pursuit of such a goal, sometimes these people tend to ignore their roots and their parents and set themselves on a path of selfish success and accomplishment. Why I say selfish is because of the hierarchies of priorities they decide to pursue.

Is going after one’s dreams a selfish thing to do? For those, who have tread this path would want to believe that indeed you lose some you gain some and if they would have stayed back then they wouldn’t have been where they are today and after all its in the nature of every species to leave their homes and take their own course, the best example of which they would want to cite as birds which leave their homes the moment they learn to fly.

For those who don’t believe in the above would want to change the very meaning of life. For these kind of people, to live signifies sharing happiness and sorrows witht their family even at the cost of curtailing their ambitions and in some cases their actual potential.

So far so good, but whom do u think are more happy and satisfied in life, the ambitious breed or the family breed? But before coming to any kind of conclusion do you think the aim of life is to be happy and satisfied or the aim of life is to lead it in as king-size manner as possible, which in turn would lead to what some might call materialistic happiness? Sometimes I wonder how wonderful it would be if one didn’t have to chose amongst the two. Not many on Earth are blessed with this luxury.

The question of our lives then boils down to whether we should go our own way without really caring about anyone else or should we plan our lives taking our near dear ones along with us?

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2 thoughts on “The Youngster’s Dilemma

  1. Very thoughtful post Kush!

    Individuals differ. They differ in thoughts, interests, ambitions, values and several such attributes that define the course of life and it’s eventual goal. With due courtesy to such differences, belonging to either breed (ambitious or familial) in extremity may seem unreasonable. However, it is the breed of ambitious extremists to whom we owe our understanding of everything. Genesis of art, science, literature, technology, spirituality (or any field of human endeavors that we can think of) and the horizons of our knowledge in respective fields have indelible marks of extremists.

    Familial happiness could be the most important thing in life but it may not be elevated to become the purpose of life. Motive power that drove scientists and astronauts to fatally dangerous missions could not have been just happiness!

    cheers,
    – vishwas

  2. Very well said Vishwas. This cannot be denied that its because of the ambitious breed that this world has witnessed the inventions which might have otherwise not been possible. In most cases, these were the people who were so focussed that they couldn’t think of any other thing apart from their ambition and goal.

    As a result, we as laymen, would want to say that because they were following a goal-oriented path, they missed out on the happiness derived from the family related incidents. Well, you lose some and gain some. In fact this brings us to another important question.

    Could these ambitious people derive happiness from what they did? Or for that matter they were over and above this petty question of personal happiness that we as normal people tend to focus on?

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